USS Arthur Radford DD-968 - History

USS Arthur Radford DD-968 - History


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Arthur W. Radford

Arthur William Radford-born in Chicago on 27 February 1896-graduated from the Naval Academy on 2 June 1916 and served in South Carolina (Battleship No. 26) before seeing duty in three successive staff assignments with: Commander, Battleship Division 1; Commander, Division 1, Pacific Fleet, as aide and flag lieutenant; and as aide and flag lieutenant on the staff of Commander, Train, Pacific Fleet.

In the spring of 1920, Radford arrived at the Naval Air Station (NAS), Pensacola, Fla., for flight instruction and received his "wings" in November. After a tour as an instructor at Pensacola, he spent two years in Washington with the Bureau of Aeronautics (BuAer) before joining Aircraft Squadrons, Battle Fleet. Service in observation squadron VO-1, from April 1925 to June 1927 followed before he saw duty at NAS, San Diego, Calif. In the spring of 1929, Radford was again assigned to Aircraft Squadrons, Battle Fleet, commanding the Alaskan Aerial Survey Detachment which investigated forest and mineral resources in that region. In November 1929, Radford moved to Saratoga (CV-3) and took command of her fighter squadron, VF-1B, the staff following spring. Assigned Battle flag 1931, he served as Rear Admiral Harry E. Yarnell's aide and secretary on a staff that included other naval aviation luminaries such as Capt. John H. Towers and Comdr. Forrest Sherman.

Following another stint with BuAer beginning in June 1932, Radford became navigator of the seaplane tender Wrig ht (AV-1). Duty as an aide to ComAirBatFor lasted until he t 101, command of NAS, Seattle, Wash., in June 1937. In May 1940, Radford became executive officer of Yorktown (CV-5). In May 1941, Radford went back to Washington for a few more months at BuAer and then became the first commanding officer of NAS, Bermuda.

America's entry into World War II in December 1941 found Radford directing the Navy's pilot training program. He inaugurated a program of intensive expansion to include all phases of operational flight training and established functional training commands to carry out his plans. Under his direction, the program, which grew through the spring of 1943, provided the Navy with the skilled pilots who spearheaded the war against the Axis. For this work Radford received the Legion of Merit.

Radford went to Carrier Division (CarDiv) 2 in April 1943 and received flag rank on 21 July of that year. Then as Commander, CarDiv 11, he directed his division's air strikes in support of the landings in the Gilberts in November and received his first Distinguished Service Medal (DSM). Then, after serving as chief of staff and aide to Commander, Aircraft, Pacific Fleet, from December 1943 to January 1944, he returned to Washington to serve as Assistant Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Air into the fall of 1944.

Breaking his flag in Yorktown (CV-10) as Commander, CarDiv 6, in November 1944, Radford directed his task group's attacks against targets in the Japanese home islands. His planes also supported the conquest of Iwo Jima and of Okinawa, earning him a second DSM.

Following a stint as Commander, Fleet Air, Seattle, lasting into the winter, Radford journeyed to Washington once more in January 1946, to fill the billet of Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Air. He returned to sea duty in March 1947 as Commander, 2d Task Fleet, and held that post into December of that yea ar before returning to Washington to become Vice Chief of Naval Operations. Becoming Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, with the collateral duty of High Commissioner, Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands, in the spring of 1949, with the rank of admiral, he was serving therein when the Korean War broke out in June 1950.

According to the citation for his third DSM, Radford "quickly and effectively prepared his command for full scale offensive operations . " He skillfully placed his warships ". to provide coordinated support of land operations to aid the Republic of Korea in her fight against domination and oppression." During his time as CINCPACFLT, Radford met Dwight D. Eisenhower in Korea following the 1952 elections and impressed the presidentelect so favorably that "Ike" soon appointed him Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

The first naval officer to hold that high office, Admiral Radford served as Chairman from June of 1953 until his retirement on 1 August 1957, winning his fourth DSM. Admiral Radford died at the Bethesda Naval Hospital on 17 August 1973.

(DD-968: d. 7,865; 1. 563'; b. 55'; dr. 29'; s. 30 + k.; cpl. 289; a. 2 5", ASROC, 6 21" tt., Sea Sparrow, LAMPS; cl. Spruance)

Arthur W. Radford (DD-968) was laid down on 31 January 1974 at Pascagoula, Miss., by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Division of Litton Industries; launched on 27 February 1975; sponsored by Mrs. Arthur W. Radford, the widow of the late admiral; placed in "special service" on 4 April 1977 upon delivery to the Navy, Comdr. David E. Woodbury in command; and commissioned at her builder's yard on 16 April 1977.

Underway for the east coast that same day, Arthur W. Radford was forced to return to her builder's yard for repairs soon thereafter, but got underway again on 30 April. Touching at Charleston on 3 and 4 May, the ship proceeded to her home port, Norfolk, which she reached on the 6th.

Three days later, she sailed for Newport, to provide sugrt for the Naval Surface Warfare Officer Training Command. hile the ship proceeded north, a LAMPS helicopter landed on her helo deck to prepare for the possible embarkation of a LAMPS detachment. The helicopter returned to Norfolk later that day, 11 May. Mooring at Newport on 13 May, the destroyer remained there until the 17th, when she headed home. Soon after returning to Norfolk, she conducted gunnery exercises and helicopter operations off the Virginia capes.

The ship headed down the coast on 24 May and reached Port Canaveral, Fla., the following day. After embarking Capt. R. K. Albright, Commander, Destroyer Squadron 22, the destroyer got underway on the 27th and, for the next few days, conducted air, surface, and sub-surface surveillance of the surrounding waters while the President of the United States, Jimmy Carter, observed operations on board the attack submarine Los Angeles (SSN-688). The destroyer rendezvoused with the submarine prior to her initial dive and then again when the submarine surfaced. Throughout the operation, she provided support services for local and national press covering the Chief Executive's voyage.

Underway for Norfolk on 31 May, Arthur W. Radford reached her home port on 2 June for local operations. While returning from waters off the Virginia capes on 6 June, the ship ran into low-visibility conditions and winds in excess of 90 knots which disabled a radar antennae and literally drove the ship outside of the main shipping channel. At one point her fathometer read only one foot of water under the keel.

Fighting her way back to the channel in the teeth of the gale, Arthur W. Radford sighted a capsized motor vessel, Dixie Lee 11, 300 yards south of Thimble Shoals Channel buoy 21. Unable to assist due to the shallow water and high winds, the destroyer notified the Coast Guard of bodies seen floating in the water. The destroyer then anchored in Hampton Roads until the wind had dropped and shipping, adrift in the vicinity, had moved off.

Arthur W. Radford then proceeded to the West Indies for training operations-including gunfire sup port. En route to Frederickstad, St. Croix, in the American Virgin Islands, in late June she conducted further weapons tests. Firing a gunnery exercise at Vieques, Puerto Rico, the destroyer returned to the eastern seaboard with a port visit to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Independence Day 1977. Further work in the Bahamas, and at Guantanamo Bay, preceded her return to Charleston, S.C., on the last day of July. She then headed home where she arrived on 3 August.

The ship returned to Pascagoula on 11 September for postshakedown availability and remained in her builder's hands until she returned to Norfolk in mid-October. Entering the Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 25 October for restricted availability, she remained there into the spring of 1978 before resuming local operations out of her home port. She principally engaged in ship unification trials and underway training before sailing south to Guantanamo Bay and Vieques for refresher training and gunfire support practice, respectively. Following these evolutions the ship returned to Norfolk on 30 July 1978.

On 23 August, Arthur W. Radford got underway from the Naval Weapons Station, Yorktown, Va., and headed for NATO exercises in the North Atlantic. En route, she participated in
Exercise "Common Effort," carrying out escort duties in an "opposed Atlantic transit," and briefly embarked Vice Admiral Wesley L. McDonald, Commander, 2d Fleet. Next came Operation "Northern Wedding" -a joint NATO exercise which began on 4 September and involved several of amphibious sim groups landing and many other facets imulated naval warfare. During that operation, Arthur W. Radford operated alongside British, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, West German, and Canadian naval units.

Following the conclusion of "Northern Wedding," the destroyer visited Copenhagen, Denmark; Rotterdam, Holland; and Portsmouth, England. She again embarked Vice Admiral McDonald at Portsmouth on 16 October and wore his flag during the return voyage to Norfolk. The admiral disembarked upon her arrival at Norfolk on 25 October. The warship then operated locally through the winter, varying periods in port of upkeep with underway training.

Arthur W. Radford cleared Norfolk on 13 March 1979, bound for the Mediterranean and a tour with the 6th Fleet. Over the next six months, she participated in a variety of exercises and visited the ports of Catania, Sicily; Split, Yugoslavia; Trieste, Italy; Alexandria, Egypt; Cannes, France; Palma and Barcelona, Spain; the French ports of Toulon and Theoule; and the Spanish ports of Rota and Valencia. During the deployment, the vessel ,red her first Harpoon missile in the Mediterranean on 28 July. Her target was the hulk of a destroyer, ex-Lansdowne (DD-486) (later the Turkish Gaziantep, D-344). Radford also participated in Exercise "Multiplex 1-79" in the Ionian Sea; Exercise "Dawn Patrol" in the Tyrrhenian and Ionian Seas; Exercise "Tridente" out of Alexandria; and Exercise "National Week" XXVII, Phases I and 2. While en route from Toulon to Theoule, France, she rescued the French ketch, Laurca, adrift 50 miles from the French resort of St. Tropez.

Clearing Rota on 12 September, Arthur W. Radford reached Norfolk on the 22d. Underway for Miami on 23 October, she served as the platform for deck landing qualifications for helicopter pilots en route, and, after touching at Mayport, Fla., to unload a crippled H-3 helicopter from HSL-30, reached Miami on 27 October for a two-day port visit.

After returning briefly to Norfolk from 31 October to 5 November, the destroye proceeded to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and participated in a training exercise with American and Canadian warsh . During the course of Exercise "Canus-Marcot" she logged her 1,000th helicopter landing of 1979. Returning to Norfolk on 21 November, she remained in port for the remainder of the year 1979.

For the first half of 1980, the warship principally operated off the eastern seaboard of the United States, and ranged as far north as Halifax and as far south as the Caribbean, working briefly out of Vieques and Roosevelt Roads, as well as out of Jacksonville, Fla. During this time, she also visited Annapolis, where Naval Academy midshipmen toured the ship's engineering plant on an orientation visit. Admiral James L. Holloway, III, the former Chief of Naval Operations, visited the ship as well.

Following a brief period at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Arthur W. Radford prepared for another extended deployment. She departed Norfolk on 21 June, emabarking HSL-34 Detachment 2, and proceeded to Roosevelt Roads, wh ere she embarked Rear Admiral Peter K. Cullins, Commander, South Atlantic Force, and his staff to become Cullins' flagship for UNITAS XXI. Visits to St. Kitts and to Bridgetown, Barbados, followed, before the destroyer sailed for Venezuelan waters.

Over the next four months, Arthur W. Radford operated with elements of the Venezuelan, Ecuadorian, Peruvian, Colombian, Trinidad and Tobagan, Argentine, Uruguayan, and Brazilian Navies. Her ports of call included Puerto La Cruz and La Guaira, Venezuela; Rodman, Panama; Manta, Ecuador; Paito and Callao, Peru; Cartagena, Colombia; Trinidad and Tobago; Santos, Brazil; Puerto Belgrano, and Bahia Blanca, Argentina; Montevideo, Uruguay; and the Brazilian ports of Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, and Recife. She also transited the Panama Canal twice during UNITAS XXI, the first time on 21 July 1980 and the second on 24 August.

Completing UNITAS XXI on 4 November, Arthur W. Radford sailed for Gabon, as a unit of the West Africa Training Cruise (WATC), reaching Libreville, the capital of Gabon, on 12 November. Over the next few weeks, she visited Tema, Ghana; Freetown, Sierra Leone; and Dakar, Senegal. Clearing Dakar on 1 December, the destroyer stopped at Guadalupe and at Roosevelt Roads on the return voyage and arrived at Norfolk on 15 December.

The ship spent the next two years engaged in operations along the east coast and in the West Indies-mostly in underway training out of Norfolk, Roosevelt Roads, and Vieques and in refresher training at Guantanamo Bay. During the summer of 1981, she operated out of Annapolis, training midshipmen. She underwent upkeep at Norfolk and Boston and received an overhaul at her builder's yard. En route to Puerto Rico, the ship had a Coast Guard detachment embarked from 20 to 23 September 1982, and cooperated with the Coast Guard on drug interdiction duties.

For the first few months of 1983, Arthur W. Radford operated primarily in the Virginia capes area, but ranged into the Atlantic as far as the Bahamas. After embarking Commander, Destroyer Squadron 26, at Norfolk on 7 March to begin a nine-month period on board, Arthur W. Radford hosted Secretary of the Navy John F. Lehman, Jr., on 29 March. A little less than one month later, the destroyer cleared Norfolk on 27 April for a six-month deployment in the Mediterranean.

Touching at Gibraltar on 10 May, Arthur W. Radford proceeded to Augusta Bay, Sicily, and thence moved to waters off the coast of Lebanon. After supporting the multinational peacekeeping force in Beirut from 20 to 28 &ay, the destroyer visited Taranto, Italy, before returning to Lebanese waters for another brief period. During a port call at the Romanian port of Constanta along with guided-missile frigate Antrim (FFG-20), the destroyer served as flagship for Vice Admiral William H. Rowden, Commander, 6th Fleet.

Visiting Catania, Sicily; Monte Carlo, Monaco; and Livorno, Italy, Arthur W. Radford exercised with 6th Fleet battle groups later that summer, later visiting Gaeta and Naples, Italy. While visiting Istanbul, Turkey, she hosted the retired Army leader and former Presidential advisor General Alexander M. Haig.

Arthur W. Radford returned to the waters off Beirut on 18 September 1983 to assume duty as ready gunfire support ship. She conducted gunfire support missions against forces threatening the peacekeeping force on 21 and 22 September until relieved on station by the battleship New Jersey (BB-62) on 8 October. Visits to La Maddalena, Sardinia, and to Tangier, Morocco, rounded out the destroyer's time in the 6th Fleet. Operating briefly with S panish Navy units en route to the turnover port of Rota, Arthur V. Radford cleared Rota on 10 November with the battle group formed around the carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). She arrived at Norfolk 11 days later, remaining there for the rest of 1983.

Arthur W. Radford operated briefly in the Virginia capes area in January 1984 before undergoing an overhaul at the Metro Machine Shipyard at Portsmouth, Va., between 16 February and 27 April. Subsequently undergoing sea trials and repairs in the floating drydock Sustain (AFDM-7), Arthur W. Radford conducted routine training out of Norfolk through early August.

The destroyer next operated out of Roosevelt Roads and off St. Croix before returning to Norfolk at the end of August and becoming flagship for Destroyer Squadron 10. After then conducting underway training in the Virginia capes area in September and October Arthur W. Radford accompanied the recommissioned battleship Iowa (BB-61) to Roosevelt Roads. She later conducted gunfire support exercises off Vieques. Returning northward, the destroyer took part in exercises off the coast of North Carolina before reaching to Norfolk on 20 November.

After local operations, Arthur W. Radford sailed for a deployment with the Middle East Force (MidEastFor) on 4 February 1985, in company with Barney (DDG-6). Rendezvousing with Antrim and Charles F. Adams (DDG-2) near Bermuda two days later, and refueling from USNS Waccamaw (T-AO-109), the destroyer reached Rota on 16 February. She then visited Naples before heading for Egypt to transit the Suez Canal on 27 February 1985.

The destroyer touched briefly at Mina Raysut, Oman, on 8 March before transiting the Strait of Hormuz the following day and entering the Persian Gulf. After touching briefly at Bahrain, Arthur W. Radford got underway on the 14th for the Persian Gulf radar picket station (RPS). Five days into her time on station, she responded to a "Mayday" from the Liberian-flag tanker Caribbean Breeze which had been attacked and set afire in the central Persian Gulf. The destroyer provided medical advice over the emergency radio channel and launched a helicopter to render assistance.

Refueling on 25 March at Sitrah Anchorage, Bahrain, Arthur W. Radford got underway to resume her radar picket duty later the same day, remaining employed thus until she moored alongside La Salle (AGF-3) or availability. The destroyer resumed steaming on radar picket station again on 8 April, also conducting surveillance operations simultaneously.

Steaming on radar picket station again on 8 April, also conducting surveillance operations simultaneously.

Arthur W. Radford embarked Rear Admiral John Addams, ComMidEastFor, on 17 April, and served as his flagship until 5 June. During that time, the destroyer served twice on radar picket duties in the Persian Gulf, the first from 17 to 26 April and the second from 23 to 29 June, and once on routine cruising. She visited the Sitrah anchorage twice during this period, and visited Manama, Bahrain, twice.

After Rear Admiral Addams shifted his flag from Arthur W. Radford, the ship served two more tours of radar picket duty in the Persian Gulf (6 to 16 June and 20 to 29 June). During the first of these periods, on 7 June, the destroyer's embarked Sikorsky SH-3 "Sea King" helicopter from squadron HS-1 transported a civilian rescued from drowning and in need of medical attention to Bahrain hospital, saving the person's life.

Arthur W. Radford underwent her final upkeep in the Persian Gulf at Mina Sulman, Manama, Bahrain, from 29 June to 4 July, observing Independence Day there before getting underway that afternoon to transit the Persian Gulf for the Strait of Hormuz. She conducted turnover to the destroyer Comte De Grasse (DD-974) the following day, and exited from the gulf.

Stopping for fuel at Mina Raysut, Oman, on 8 July, Arthur W. Radford transited the Strait of Bab el Mandeb in company with Antrim on 10 July, and the two warships conducted freedom of navigation operations off the coast of the Democratic People's Republic of Yemen on the 11th. The destroyer transited the Suez Canal on the 14th, and replenished from the oiler USNS Neosho (T-AO-143) that same day. Fueling from USNS Truckee (T-AO-144) the following day, Arthur W. Radford conducted a port visit to Benidorm, Spain, from 20 to 23 July before reaching Rota on the 24th. Proceeding thence with Antrim, Barney, and Charles F. Adams, the destroyer sailed for Norfolk on 24 July. After visiting Ponta Delgada, in the Azores, and Bermuda, en route, Arthur W. Radford reached her home port on 5 August 1985.

The destroyer remained at Norfolk into late October, preparing for a command inspection and operating locally in the Virginia capes operating area. Early in this period, Hurricane "Gloria" prompted Arthur W. Radford to depart Norfolk on 13 September 1985, and proceed to the upper Chesapeake Bay anchorage to ride out the storm. The destroyer returned to her home port on 21 September.

Departing Norfolk on 25 October, Arthur W. Radford sailed for Nova Scotia, and arrived at Halifax on the 28th. After being briefed for her participation in an exercise, SHAREM 62, the
ship departed Halifax on the following day for Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland. Transiting the Strait of 'Belle Isle on the 31st, Arthur W. Radford reached her destination on 1 November, and took part in SHAREM 62 until the 6th, when she sailed for Halifax.

Following the post-exercise debriefing, Arthur W. Radford sailed for Norfolk, arrivin at her home port on 13 November. Moving up the eastern seaboard, the destroyer visited Boston (5 to 8 December) before spending a brief period at Newport serving as Surface Warfare Officer School (SWOS) school ship from 9 to 12 December. Radford then returned to the Norfolk area, unloading weapons at Yorktown from 15 to 18 December before conducting a dependents' cruise on the 18th.

The destroyer un derwent a restricted availability until late March 1986, running her post-repair trials on 29 and 30 March before proceeding to Yorktown to take on weapons. Radford operated locally out of Norfolk into late July, interspersing this work with a drydocking in Sustain from 30 May to 17 June, for repairs to her struts and stem tubes, as well as an inspection of her sonar dome. Following refresher training in Guantanamo Bay, the ship touched at Roosevelt Roads efor re operating at Vieques for gunfire support practice, surface gunnery exercises, and missile shoots. After visiting Fort Lauderdale en route, the ship returned to Norfolk on 12 September.

Arthur W. Radford returned to Guantanamo Bay soon thereafter to embark HSL-36, detachment 6, and then proceeded to Roosevelt Roads, where she arrived on 6 October to load ammunition, to take on fuel, and to embark a Coast Guard law enforcement detachment along with Commander, Caribbean Squadron (ComCaribRon) and his staff. The ship operated in her assigned waters from 6 to 19 October, returning to Roosevelt Roads to debark ComCaribRon and his staff.

Detaching the Coast Guardsmen at Nassau on 22 October at the commencement of the ship's port visit there, Arthur W. Radford sailed for Norfolk on the 25th, arriving two days later. As before, her stay in port proved brief, for she got underway on 3 November for the Bermuda operating area for exercises. One day out of Norfolk, she assisted Preble (DDG-46) in searching for a crewman who had been lost in the Cape Hatteras area.

Arthur W. Radford conducted her exercises, SHAREM 1-87, before returning to Norfolk on 16 November. With the exception of a period underway in the Virginia capes operating area on 9 and 10 December, Arthur W. Radford spent the month of December in port in Norfolk. As of mid-1987, Arthur W. Radford was still active in the Atlantic Fleet, homeported at Norfolk.


ARTHUR W RADFORD DD 968

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Spruance Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid 31 January 1974 - Launched 27 February 1975

Naval Covers

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Contents

Underway for the East Coast the day she was commissioned, Arthur W. Radford was forced to return to her builder's yard for repairs soon thereafter, but got underway again on 30 April. Touching at Charleston, South Carolina on 3 and 4 May, the ship proceeded to her home port Norfolk, Virginia which she reached on 6 May.

Three days later, she steamed for Newport, Rhode Island, to provide support for the Naval Surface Warfare Officer Training Command. While the ship proceeded north, a LAMPS helicopter practice-landed on her helo deck to prepare for the embarkation of a LAMPS III detachment. The helicopter returned to Norfolk later that day 11 May. Mooring at Newport on 13 May, the destroyer remained there until 17 May, when she headed home. Soon after returning to Norfolk, she conducted gunnery exercises and helicopter operations off the Virginia Capes.

The ship headed down the coast on 24 May and reached Port Canaveral, Florida the following day. After embarking Capt. R. K. Albright, Commander, Destroyer Squadron 22 (DesRon㺖) the destroyer got underway on 27 May and, for the next few days, conducted air, surface, and sub-surface surveillance of the surrounding waters while President Jimmy Carter, observed operations on board the attack submarine Los Angeles. The destroyer rendezvoused with the submarine prior to her initial dive and then again when the submarine surfaced. Throughout the operation, she provided support services for local and national press covering the Chief Executive's voyage.

Underway for Norfolk on 31 May, Arthur W. Radford reached her home port on 2 June for local operations. While returning from waters off the Virginia Capes on 6 June, the ship ran into low-visibility conditions and winds in excess of 90 knots (170 km/h) which disabled a radar antenna and drove the ship outside of the main shipping channel. At one point her fathometer read only 30 centimeters of water under the keel.

Fighting her way back to the channel in the teeth of the gale Arthur W. Radford sighted a capsized motor vessel, Dixie Lee II, 300 yards south of Thimble A Shoals Channel buoy㺕. Unable to assist due to the shallow water and high winds, the destroyer notified the United States Coast Guard of bodies seen floating in the water. The destroyer then anchored in Hampton Roads until the wind had dropped and shipping, adrift in the vicinity, had moved off.

Arthur W. Radford then proceeded to the West Indies for training operations including gunfire support. En route to Frederickstad, Saint Croix, in the U.S. Virgin Islands, in late June she conducted further weapons tests. Firing a gunnery exercise at Vieques, Puerto Rico, the destroyer returned to the eastern seaboard with a port visit to Fort Lauderdale, Florida on Independence Day 1977. During this firing exercise, a dummy shell hit USS Opportune (ARS-41) which was towing a target sled. Further work in the Bahamas, and at Guantanamo Bay, preceded her return to Charleston, South Carolina, on the last day of July. She then headed home where she arrived on 3 August.

The ship returned to Pascagoula on 11 September for post-shakedown availability and remained in her builder's hands until she returned to Norfolk in mid-October. Entering the Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 25 October for restricted availability, she remained there into the spring of 1978 before resuming local operations out of her home port. She principally engaged in ship qualification trials and underway training before steaming south to Guantanamo Bay and Vieques for refresher training and gunfire support practice, respectively. Following these evolutions, the ship returned to Norfolk on 30 July 1978.

On 23 August, Arthur W. Radford got underway from the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown Virginia, and headed for NATO exercises in the $3. En route, she participated in Exercise "Common Effort", carrying out escort duties in an "opposed Atlantic transit", and briefly embarked Vice Admiral Wesley L. McDonald, Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet. Next came Operation "Northern Wedding" a joint NATO exercise which began on 4 September and involved several carrier groups in an amphibious landing and many other facets of simulated naval warfare. During that operation, Radford operated alongside Royal Navy, Royal Danish Navy, Royal Norwegian Navy, Swedish Navy, West German Navy, and Canadian Forces Maritime naval units. During this exercise, the ship encountered huge seas from Hurricane Flossie.

Following the conclusion of "Northern Wedding", the destroyer visited Copenhagen, Denmark Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and Portsmouth, England. She again embarked VADM McDonald at Portsmouth on 16 October and wore his flag during the return voyage to Norfolk. The admiral disembarked upon her arrival at Norfolk on 25 October. The destroyer then operated locally through the winter, varying periods between in port for upkeep and getting underway for training.


First deployment and interim

Arthur W. Radford cleared Norfolk on 13 March 1979, bound for the Mediterranean and a tour with the U.S. 6th Fleet. Over the next six months, she participated in a variety of exercises and visited the ports of Catania, Sicily Split, Yugoslavia Trieste, Italy Alexandria, Egypt Cannes, France, Palma, Spain Barcelona, Spain Toulon, France, Théoule, France, Rota, Spain and Valencia, Spain. During the eployment, the vessel fired her first Harpoon missile in the Mediterranean on 28 July. Her target was the hulk of a destroyer, ex-Lansdowne (later the Turkish TCG Gaziantep (D-344)). Radford also participated in Exercise "Multiplexف-79" in the Ionian Sea, Exercise "Dawn Patrol" in the Tyrrhenian Sea and Ionian Seas, Exercise "Tridente" out of Alexandria, and Exercise "National Week" XXVII, Phasesف and 2. While en route from Toulon to Theoule, France, she rescued the French ketch, Laurca, adrift 50 miles (80 km) from the French resort of St. Tropez.

Clearing Rota on 12 September, Arthur W. Radford reached Norfolk on 22 September. Underway for Miami, Florida on 23 October, she served as the platform for deck landing qualifications for helicopter pilots en route, and, after touching at Mayport, Florida to unload a crippled Hك helicopter from HSL-30, reached Miami on 27 October for a two-day port visit.

After returning briefly to Norfolk from 31 October to 5 November, the destroyer proceeded to Halifax, Nova Scotia and participated in a training exercise with American and Canadian warships. During the course of Exercise "Canus-Marcot" she logged her 1,000th helicopter landing of 1979. Returning to Norfolk on 21 November, she remained in port for the remainder of the year 1979.

For the first half of 1980, the warship principally operated off the eastern seaboard of the United States, and ranged as far north as Halifax and as far south as the Caribbean, working briefly out of Vieques and Roosevelt Roads Naval Station, as well as out of Jacksonville, Florida. During this time, she also visited Annapolis, Maryland where United States Naval Academy midshipmen toured the ship's engineering plant on an orientation visit. Admiral James L. Holloway III, the former Chief of Naval Operations, visited the ship as well. FTG2 Mark (Spud) Coy left the ship on 20 March 1980. DS1 Mark (VD) Vendeiro, plankowner, departed the ship on or about 18 June 1980. ETN2 Grant Evans, Plankowner, departed the ship on or about June 1980.


Military

The Norfolk-based Spruance-class destroyer USS Arthur W. Radford (DD 968) decommissioned on March 18, 2003 at Naval Station Norfolk. The ship will now serve as the test platform for the U.S. Navy's future destroyer, DD(X).

This will not be the first time Radford has been used as a test platform. The ship used the newest and most robust cryptologic system during its last deployment. Although many ships now use this new cryptology system, Radford was the first to deploy with it.

Radford also introduced the Advanced Enclosed Mast System (AEM/S) to the Fleet in 1998. The ship's unique, enclosed superstructure, which literally stands out among the masts of other ships, protects major antennas and other sensitive equipment. It also reduces maintenance and significantly reduces radar signature.

The ship will now be towed to Philadelphia where the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) Inactive Ships Maintenance Office (NISMO) will oversee its inactivation. Eventually, the ship will be towed to Pascagoula, Miss. where Northrop Grumman Ship Systems will equip it with three DD(X) Engineering Development Models, including the Integrated Power System (IPS), the Composite Deckhouse, and the Dual Band Radar. The IPS will allow rapid reconfiguration of power, reduced acoustic noise, and greater flexibility in ship design, according to David Caskey, a NAVSEA spokesperson.

The conversion, scheduled to begin in the fall of 2004, will take approximately one year.

Once Radford is converted, at-sea testing will begin in the Gulf of Mexico and Virginia Capes Operating Areas, including Lambert's Point Range in Norfolk, and Wallops Island Range near the eastern Virginia shore. The Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center Range in the Bahamas will also be used for the ship's testing.

The ship's crest is highly symbolic of the ship's namesake, Admiral Arthur W. Radford, and his uncompromising devotion to the defense of our country.

The gold wings represent Admiral Radford's own wings which he earned in 1920. Together with the ship's bow these wings allude to his command of Carrier Divisions 11 and 6, Pacific, during World War II. The four white stars symbolize is promotion to Admiral, while the Red Torii represents his involvement in both World War II and the Korean War.

Three divisions of the shield itself refer to the three components of the armed forces Air, Sea, and Land, which each form a portion of our nation's protective shield. The four unsheathed swords on the Defense Blue background symbolize his appointment to the head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and his re-appointment to this position for a second term.

Admiral Radford's career was dominated by three traits which are displayed on the Navy Blue banner beneath the shield: Patriotism, Perseverance, and Preparedness. Today these qualities serve as the guiding motto for USS Arthur W. Radford's crew.

Admiral Arthur W. Radford

Admiral Radford served in three wars. He was onboard the USS SOUTH CAROLINA, a battleship in the Atlantic Fleet, and was Aide and First Lieutenant to commander, Battleship Division ONE during World War One. He served in the Navy Department's Bureau of Aeronautics and Naval Personnel and in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations early in World War II and as Commander, Carrier Divisions 11 and 6, and on the Staff of Commander, Aircraft Pacific, during the after part of that war. At the outbreak of Korean hostilities, he was serving as commander in Chief, U. S. Pacific Fleet, later being given the responsibility of the Marianas Bonin area and the Philippines Formosa area.

Born in Chicago, Illinois, in February 1896, he entered the Naval Academy in 1912 after graduating from High School in Grinnel, Iowa. He graduated and was commissioned in 1916 and assigned to USS SOUTH CAROLINA. From the end of World War One until 1920 he served staff duty. In April 1920 he was assigned to flight training school and was designated a Naval Aviator in November of that year. Follow on assignments included the newly established Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, as well as the aviation units of the tender AROOSTOCK, and the battleships COLORADO and PENNSYLVANIA. In December 1945, he became Deputy Commander of Naval Operations (Air) and after a year in command of SECOND TASK FLEET, he returned to the Navy department as Vice Chief of Naval Operations. In June 1953 he was appointed Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He retired on 1 August 1957.


Nothing says the Delaware River up around Philadelphia and Camden more distinctly than a group of Hays tugs, here Big Daddy, High Roller, and Purple Hays. That’s the stern of Grape Ape to the left. No company, I gather, has had more fun naming their boats than the Hays Tug and Launch folks. I hope Ed Roth got photos of these boats.

And I’ve never had so much fun on the Delaware River area than I did the day my friend John Curdy took me on a tour there.

Timothy McAllister was docked nearby. She’s almost a twin of the sixth boro’s Ellen McAllister.

Amberjack (1981) was still in gray. She’s now the latest Thomas Dann, but I’ve not seen her yet.

I’m not sure where the 1967 Jakobson-built Grace Moran is,

but Helen D is now Sarah D, and is regularly seen on the Hudson.

Active, a 1956 Blount product, has been sold south and is now Chandler B, operating out of Virginia.

Soon after I took this photo, Coral Sea was sold to a Nigerian company and, at last report, was operating off Nigeria as Uganwaafor 2. I suspect she’s currently inactive.

Texan here is mostly out of the notch of Ponciana. She’s currently near Beaumont TX on the Neches River.

And finally, it’s USS Arthur W. Radford (DD 968) getting prepped for reefing. About a year later that reefing happened about 30 miles offshore, which appears to be out of range for most fishermen.

All photos, June 2010, by WVD, who will be in and on the Delaware River later this week, way in in the wild part of the river in NYS, trying to commune with the wild. Don’t be concerned if no new posts appear for a spell after Wednesday.


Laststandonzombieisland

Back in the early 1970s, the US Navy needed a replacement for the old FRAM’d WWII era Sumner and Gearing leftovers from the 1940s and 50s in the fleet. These were small, 3500-4000 ton ships that carried an 8-cell ASROC launcher, 4 5-inch/58 guns in twin mounts, and two triple Mk32 ASW torpedo launchers. They were sitting ducks to anti-ship missiles, could not carry helicopters, and packed almost 400 sailors into a tin can made to all the best specs of 1942.

The USS Orleck, shown here in 1964, a WWII veteran still going strong, by the 1970s needed to be replaced. Ironically, while all of the Spruances are gone, Orleck endures as a floating museum ship in Lake Charles, La. and is slated to go to Jacksonville in coming months

To replace these old boats, the Spruance class, a mighty 31 destroyers, were built between 1972-1983, all at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula.

Sketch in the 1973-4 Jane’s Fighting Ships on the planned Spruance class

Artist’s conception of the Navy’s DD-963-class destroyer. The ship, designed by Litton Industries’ Ingalls West Division at El Secondo, California, will be mass-produced at the Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation, Pascagoula, Mississippi. Catalog #: USN 1144349 Copyright Owner: National Archives. Original Creator: Artist, Russ Vickers

Six Spruance class destroyers fitting out, circa May 1975. Ships are, from left Paul F. Foster (DD-964) Spruance (DD-963), then running trials Arthur W. Radford (DD-968) Elliot (DD-967) Hewitt (DD-966) and Kinkaid (DD-965). Ingalls East Bank, Pascagoula

Six Spruance-class destroyers being built at Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi. 24 June 1975. From top to bottom: USS Peterson (DD-969), USS Arthur W. Radford (DD-968), USS Elliot (DD-967), USS Hewitt (DD-966), Kinkaid (DD-965), USS Caron (DD-970) PCUs are visible

At least five Spruance-class destroyers being built by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Division of Litton Industries at Pascagoula, Mississippi, with the two closest being USS Conolly (DD-979) and USS Moosbrugger (DD-980), 25 May 1977

As a kid, I used to sit at the old Point on Beach Boulevard and watch these sleek 563-foot long greyhounds birthed for Poseidon’s fox hunts.

The USS Ingersoll, DD-990 was a good example of how the “Spru-cans” came out of Pascagoula in the 1980s. She is armed here with just her guns, torpedoes, ASROC, and a Sea Sparrow launcher. Bring on the Red Banner Fleet!

They were called the “Love Boats” back then since they were the size of WWII light cruisers (8000-tons), yet only carried a pair of 5-inch guns (Mk45 rapid-fire jobs that provided more firepower than twice as many of the old Sumner‘s 5-inch/58s), twin triple ASW tubes, and an 8-cell ASROC launcher.

Bow of the destroyer USS O’Bannon (DD-987), a Spruance-class destroyer, showing the ship’s Mark 16 8-cell ASROC anti-submarine rocket launcher, foreground, and a Mark 45 5-inch/54-caliber gun

Still, they made good backdrop for 1984 recruiting commercials– set in British controlled Hong Kong!

In their defense, most were funded by the bankrupt Carter military and their armament suite was superior to the destroyers they were supposed to replace. Also, they had a twin helicopter hangar that could support a pair of sub-busting choppers, a battle implement WWII destroyers never dreamed of.

This changed over time and by the late 1980s, they were pretty capable ships

Over the 1980s and 90s, they were increasingly armed with other weapons systems. Some 24 ships of the class swapped out their ASROC launcher for a 61-cell Mk41 VLS system like on the Ticonderoga class cruisers (which were based on the Spruance hull). All ships also gained an 8-pack of Harpoon SSMs, an 8-cell NATO Sea Sparrow SAM launcher (also capable of being used against surface ships), and a pair of 20mm CIWS R2D2 guns for swatting away incoming missiles. Ten more of these had a 21 cell RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile launcher mounted on the starboard fantail to further protect these ships from more modern anti-ship missiles. Several of those that weren’t converted to VLS were given quadruple ABL Mark 43 Tomahawk missile launchers like on the recommissioned Iowa class battleships.

USS Deyo after her ASROC was removed and replaced with the 61-cell VLS. Also, note the Phalanx CIWS mounts port and starboard.

They proved the backbone of fleet operations throughout the last decade of the Cold War, the sordid engagements in the Persian Gulf, and the Navy’s part in the war on drugs.

Spruance-class destroyer USS Peterson (DD-969) with Soviet Moma AGS class survey vessel Nakhodka in the Sargasso Sea 1983 on the rescue op for Victor III-class SSN K-324. On Halloween 1983, K-324 snagged the frigate USS McCloy’s towed sonar array cable about 300 miles west of Bermuda, causing damage to the submarine’s propeller. The Soviet attack boat was towed to Cienfuegos, Cuba for repairs, and Red Fleet technicians recovered some parts of McCloy’s array.

USS Peterson (DD-969) keeping tabs on YAK-38 Forger, most likely landing on a Soviet Kiev-class carrier

Speaking of carriers, there was even some thought to making an “aviation destroyer” variant.

The “through deck destroyer” variant would place a ski jump on a Spruance hull and be able to carry as many as 10 VTOL aircraft

Their long legs (6000+ nm at 20 knots on two turbines), allowed them to self-deploy away from the battle group and a lot of the flag-waving done in foreign ports during the Regan-Bush-Clinton years was done by Spruances operating alone. Gone were the days of boilers and steam plants.

USS Spruance (DD-963) ship’s propulsion control center, during her trials period, May 1975. Official U.S. USN 1162172

USS Cushing late in her career. Note the RAM missile launcher on her stern.

Then, starting in 1998, these hardy destroyers that were at the top of their game, began to retire.

When the Spruance‘s left the Navy, they took with them 1494 Mk41 VLS cells which carried mainly Tomahawk cruise missiles along with a smattering of ASROC sub-busters. They also faded away with 62 5-inch guns, 62 CIWS guns, 249 Harpoon anti-ship missile launch spots, 62 LAMPS helicopter hangar spots, 249 Sea Sparrow missile launcher cells, 210 RAM missile cells, and 186 Mk32 ASW Torpedo tubes. Those 7 hulls that were not equipped with VLS retained their ASROC launchers which gave the fleet another 56 of those weapons.

In 1989, the US Navy had 63 Knox/Brooke/Garcia-class frigates, 51 OHP type guided-missile frigates, 31 Spruances, 4 Kidd-Class DDGs (Mk-26/SM-2 armed Spurances) 27 Ticonderoga class CGs, 23 older Charles Adams-class DDGs, 10 Farragut-class DDGs, six nuclear CGNs, 19 Belknap/Truxtun/Leheay-class CGs, four huge Iowa-class Battleships, and the 15,000-ton cruiser Long Beach as large surface combatants. This is a total of 239 surface warships capable of blue water operations.

Today they have in commission: 22 remaining Ticos, 12 OHPs (that are largely disarmed and rapidly retiring), 4 (unproven) LCS’s, and 62 Burke-class destroyers, the first of which was laid down on 16 September 1989. That’s an even 100-ships, or a reduction by about 58% from the late 1980s. Granted, the US Navy doesn’t have to go to war with the Soviets anymore ala-Red Storm Rising, but there is still a global need for surface combatants from the South China Sea to the HOA to the Med and the Persian Gulf. A hundred surface ships can’t be everywhere at once.

All good things come to an end: last Spruance-class destroyer USS Hayler (DD-997) in hard starboard turn during her Acceptance Trials, circa late February 1983.

You can argue that the 96-cell VLS equipped DDG-51 class destroyers replaced the Spru-cans, DDGs, and retired CGs on a 2:3 basis, but the DDG-51 lacked the extra 5-inch mount, and, in early models, the aircraft capability. Instead of being crammed full of TLAMs, these new DDGs have to allocate most of their space to carrying surface to air missiles. Further, the 󈧷s are tasked increasingly with fleet air defense and (now) with ABM missions. All the while their ASW, ASuW, and NGFS capability are being marginalized. Yes, the 51’s replaced the Spurances and the 1970s vintage CGNs of the South Carolina and Virginia-class in so much as AAW is concerned, but they did not fully replace their capability in ASW and NGFS. The Spruances, unlike the Burkes, was dedicated to ASW, ASuW, and land strike with both naval gunfire and cruise missiles. With the Burkes, its a side-job.

Iowa bracketed by Spruance Class destroyers Deyo and Comte de Grasse

Surely the Spurances would now be long in the teeth, ranging from the 1975-commissioned DD-963 to the 1983-dated DD-997, they would all be over thirty years old. However, the Ticonderoga-class cruisers are roughly the same age. In fact, they use the same hull and below-deck machinery. In 2003, the newer 22 of the 27 ships (CG-52 to CG-73) in that class were upgraded to keep them combat-relevant, giving the ships a service life of at least 35 years each. Had a similar mechanical upgrade been given to the 24-VLS equipped Spurances, they would all still be in service. In fact, given that timeline, DD-997 would only be expected to decommission in 2018. More on this ship below.

Instead, all 31 Spruances were rapidly decommissioned and mothballed between 1998 and 2005, when the ships were all in their 20’s. Instead of being refurbed to serve another decade or two, they were stricken from the Navy List. No sooner were they stricken then they were systematically sunk in a series of fleet training exercises, dismantled, or otherwise scrapped.

Like Megatron and Osama Bin Laden, most of the Spruances were sunk in deep water. Here the USS Hayler, DD-997, commissioned in 1983, is being sunk as a target on 13 November 2004. Most 21-year old ships are still in service, with another 10-15 years left on their hulls. Her story is typical of her class. Not even her 127mm guns, standard issue on US Navy destroyers, were salvaged.

It can be guessed that since they were too close in design to the still very active Tico class cruisers, they were too sensitive to give away as military aid to the likes of Pakistan, Mexico, or Colombia. Just one of their number, the former USS Paul Foster, remains. She has been in use since 2004 as an unnamed and non-commissioned test ship for the US Navy as the Self Defense Test Ship (SDTS). In this role, she is a remote control drone boat, used as a hard target for new weapons systems.


USS Arthur Radford DD-968 - History

Length: (LBP) 529 Feet

Beam: 55.1 Feet

Depth: 35 Feet

Full Load Draft: 21.88 Feet

Displacement: 9,375 LT

Vessel Type: Destroyer

On 5 February 1999,while conducting exercises off Hampton Roads, VA, the USS Arthur W. Radford was involved in a collision at sea with a Saudi Arabian container vessel. The Saudi vessel 's stem and bulbous bow penetrated the starboard side of the Radford, centered near frame 69 (approximately at the location of the forward 5"gun mount). As a result of the collision, the Radford experienced significant structural damage and flooding from frames 58 through 94,with additional flooding within sonar equipment spaces between frames 29 and 58. Post damage inspections indicated that flooding was complete (free-flooded to the waterline). Structural damage from the stem of the Saudi vessel consisted of complete penetration of the side shell and main deck from the 1st platform deck (24'above baseline) on the side shell to the ship 's centerline on the strength (01) deck, with damage extending mainly from frames 52 through 84. Additional structural damage below the waterline from the bulbous bow of the Saudi vessel consisted of complete penetration of the side and bottom shell from the 2nd platform deck (15'above baseline) to the center vertical keel at the baseline, with damage extending mainly from frames 64 through 82.Outside these primary penetration areas, there was significant buckling of decks and tripping of stiffeners caused by the transverse force of the collision. Thus, many of the structural members outside the primary penetration area provided reduced effective strength to the hull girder.

Norfolk Naval Shipyard was tasked with stabilizing the vessel and drydocking for initial assessment and planning for eventual repair/replacement of the bow of the ship. Initial assessment of the collision damage to the ship was provided utilizing POSSE. Additionally, POSSE was utilized to provide assistance in the development of a weight removal and deballasting plan for preparing the ship for drydocking on 25 February. POSSE was also utilized to provide an evaluation of the drydock block bearing loads and ship's structural strength during and following the drydocking process. Finally, POSSE was utilized to provide an initial assessment of stability and structural strength of a potential (proposed) refloating of the ship with the bow section removed (forward of frame 94). The ship was drydocked at Norfolk Naval Shipyard Drydock #3 on 25 February.


Initial Lightship Weight Distribution

The ship 's initial (undamaged) condition was developed utilizing an existing SUPSALV electronic POSSE model for the DD 963 class (with VLS). This electronic POSSE model included full entry of hull and all compartment offsets into the 3-dimensional electronic model, in addition to representation of a number of ship structural sections for longitudinal strength calculations. Lightship weights (weights, centers, and longitudinal weight distribution) were based on class data and modified to match DD 968.The initial (intact) load case was developed based upon detailed weight logs provided by Norfolk Naval Shipyard, matched to the ship's underway drafts.


Hull Stations/Offsets and Compartmentation

1. Collision Damage Assessment:

As a result of the collision, the Radford experienced significant structural damage and flooding from frames 58 through 94, with additional flooding within sonar equipment spaces between frames 29 and 58. Post-damage inspections indicated that flooding was complete (free-flooded to the waterline). POSSE was used to calculate trim, stability, and residual strength of the Radford in the afloat damaged condition. Damaged drafts were calculated to be 26.4' forward and 20.0'aft (trim of 6.39' by the bow). Actual drafts on 2/7/99 were 26'5" (26.42') forward and 20'2" (20.15') aft. The ship maintained sufficient transverse stability following damage (as indicated by the righting arm curve and a GM of 3.16'). Subsequent evaluation of the righting arm curve indicated that the stability met underway wind heel and roll criteria of DDS079-1.

Damaged Hull Girder Strength Issues:
Structural damage from the stem of the Saudi vessel consisted of complete penetration of the side shell and main deck from the 1st platform deck (24'above baseline) on the side shell to the ship 's centerline on the strength (01) deck, with damage extending mainly from frames 52 through 84.Additional structural damage from the bulbous bow of the Saudi vessel consisted of complete penetration of the side and bottom shell from the 2nd platform deck (15' above baseline) to the center vertical keel at the baseline, with damage extending mainly from frames 64 through 82.Outside these primary penetration areas, there was significant buckling of decks and tripping of stiffeners caused by the transverse force of the collision. Thus, many of the structural members outside the primary penetration area provided reduced effective strength to the hull girder.

With the significant structural damage experienced by the RADFORD during the collision, the ship 's hull girder strength was seriously impaired in way of the damaged section. POSSE was utilized to provide evaluation of the residual hull girder strength for the damaged condition. Based upon structural surveys, damage was applied to structural elements in the damaged section for purposes of calculation of section modulii and shear areas. For structural elements deemed completely ineffective, the elements were removed from section modulii and shear area calculations. For structural elements deemed only partially effective (i.e. due to partial buckling of plating and/or tripping of stiffeners), the elements 'effectiveness was reduced by applying a "corrosion "factor, reducing the contribution of the elements to the section modulii and shear area calculations. The damaged section (e.g. at frame 69) was calculated to have lost up to 60%of it 's original section modulii (to both keel and deck) and approximately 35%of it 's shear area about it's horizontal neutral axis (i.e. for vertical bending and shear).

POSSE calculated bending and shear stresses in way of the damaged section. Maximum stresses were under 30 ksi compression at the keel and 15 ksi tension at the strength (01) deck for bending, and under 5 ksi for shear for all potential damaged load cases envisioned. As the hull structure is primarily HTS (High Tensile Strength) steel, with a nominal yield strength of approximately 51 ksi, there was a factor of safety of less than 1.8 to yield in the extreme elements of the keel (compressive yielding). It should be noted that POSSE utilizes prismatic beam theory in evaluation of hull girder stresses. Thus, bending stresses are assumed to vary linearly across the section, with maximums at the extreme elements (keel and deck). Actual stresses do not vary linearly due to non-linear phenomenon of shear flow and shear lag. However, for purposes of evaluating risk of hull girder failure, experience has shown that this approach is reasonably accurate, provided non-linearities are considered and suitable factors of safety to hull girder failure are provided for.

In order to increase the factor of safety to yield in the damaged structural section, additional stiffening members were fabricated and welded to the hull. Three large (36"T) beams were welded to the strength (01) deck, and one large (36"T) beam was welded to the starboard side shell at the main deck level. These stiffening members had the net effect of increasing the section moduli of the damaged section by approximately 10-15% thus reducing maximum bending stresses by 9-14% in the damaged section.

Most combatant ship structures are designed and built with sufficient stiffness such that hull girder yield is the initial or limiting mode of structural failure within the hull girder. However, with the extensive damage experienced by the RADFORD, other modes of hull girder failure may have become limiting at or near the damaged section at frame 69 and needed to be considered. For example, with unsupported stiffened panels near the keel (due to loss of adjacent supporting structure), panels may first fail by buckling, or stiffeners may first fail by tripping. This is important because those elements near the keel were under high compressive stresses.


Damaged Structural Section at Frame 69
(black = fully effective, red = ineffective, yellow = partially effective)

A new feature available with the Windows version of POSSE (still in Beta testing) will be a capability to evaluate hull girder ultimate strength utilizing the U.S. Navy 's computer program Ultimate Strength (ULSTR) as a peripheral application (i.e. run from within POSSE). ULSTR performs a "limit state "analysis, and evaluates the ultimate hull girder strength by calculating bending moment necessary to yield, buckle or trip structural elements in sequence. Elements also shed load following initial failure, and thus adjacent elements must pick up the load shed by the failed adjacent elements. This can lead to a sequenced collapse of a hull girder, which may take place at or below bending moment levels which first cause yield in the extreme elements. ULSTR was run within POSSE for the evaluation of the ultimate bending moment capacity of the damaged section at frame 69.Results of this analysis estimated that the damaged section had lost up to 55%of it 's original moment carrying capacity (with a factor of safety of less than 1.7 to hull girder collapse). Additionally, the "limit state "analysis indicated that initial failure mechanisms were associated with tripping of stiffeners and buckling of "beam-column "elements (stiffened panel elements), initiating at bending moment levels as low as 22,000 ft-Ltons. The maximum calculated vertical bending moment in any damaged load case envisioned was approximately 15,000 ft-Ltons. Thus, factor of safety to initial hull girder element compressive failure was calculated to be less than 1.5.

2. Weight Removal and Deballasting Plan for Drydocking:

    Removal of all of the nearly 300 Ltons of ordnance onboard. Much of this ordnance was located in the forward magazines, which were flooded, and was the goal of the early weight removal for reasons of ordnance safety.

With successful lightering, it was calculated that the vessel would obtain drafts of 20.88 forward and 21.21'aft for entering drydock. Stability would remain acceptable, even as lightering of the fuel/water from the forward compensated fuel bank was accomplished prior to ordnance removal. Minimum expected GM was calculated to be 2.3 feet. The righting arm curve was evaluated to meet underway wind heel and roll stability criteria of DDS079-1.Additionally, maximum hull girder bending stresses in the damaged section would be reduced to less than 25 ksi (compression at the keel).

Following removal of ordnance, it was discovered that predicted trimming effects were not obtained. It was subsequently concluded that the ordnance weight and location information provided with the loading condition information was apparently inaccurate. However, despite this shortcoming, acceptable fore and aft drafts for entering drydock were obtained, providing a 2'clearance over the sill.

3.Initial Assessment of Drydock Block Loading and Hull Girder Bending Stresses in Drydock:

Per request of Norfolk Naval Shipyard Naval Architects, POSSE was utilized to model the USS RADFORD in drydock. The "Multiple Point Grounding "(MPG) feature in POSSE was used to model drydock blocks (keel and side blocks), and evaluate effects of pumping down the drydock on individual block loading, as well as on hull girder stresses. Note that all damaged compartments drain into the drydock as the dock is "pumped down ",as they are open to "free-flood". Additionally, the sonar dome would be dewatered during or shortly following drydock dewatering.


Drydock blocking modeled using POSSE's "Multiple Point Grounding" capability.

The drydock block buildup was modeled by 88 individual "grounding points ", at specified locations of the individual drydock blocks. POSSE rigorously calculated reaction force on each of the individual blocks required to satisfy force equilibrium. For the initial case where the drydock is pumped down, but the sonar dome remains full, individual block loads (in Ltons) were calculated to range from 194 ltons (on the aft keel block) to 21 ltons (on the forward keel block). It should be noted that this approach assumes that the ship is represented by a rigid body, with the given shape, weight and center of gravity. Thus, the block loading distribution is calculated based upon the ship 's geometry (offsets), center of gravity, and block distribution (locations). The hull was assumed NOT to deflect due to the drydocking (i.e. "hull deflection "was set to the default "no deflection of hull girder " in the "options "menu in Salvage Response). One alternative under POSSE 2.2 is to allow POSSE to calculate hull deflections based upon hull girder structural strength and longitudinal bending moment, or "inertias ". However, this approach requires a complex numerical iteration for the program to converge on a solution for both ground reaction at the 88 grounding points, plus the hull girder deflections. This multiple iteration scheme is numerically complex and does not converge easily. In fact, in this configuration, convergence could not be obtained with "hull deflection " set to "computed deflection based on hull girder inertias", unless the number of grounding points (i.e. drydock blocks) was reduced to a small number (less than 10 in this case) and the "spring stiffness "was significantly reduced to soften the force/compression curve on each block.

Predicted longitudinal bending and shear stresses are presented below. Bending stress at the damage section was expected to reach 41 ksi at the keel (compression) and 23 ksi at the strength deck (tension). The predicted bending moment at the damaged section was calculated to be approximately 24,500 ft-Ltons, which would be in excess of the ultimate bending moment capacity of the damaged section, calculated based on ULSTR analysis. This was clearly undesirable. Given the undesirable stress levels and bending moment in drydock with the sonar dome full, two possible steps could be taken to reduce bending moments at this damaged section:

    Dewater the sonar dome prior to emptying the drydock or dewatering the sonar dome during the drydock dewatering process, but prior to the drydock becoming empty. This provides reduced bending moments at the damaged section. Bending stress at the damage section with the sonar dome dewatered were calculated to be reduced to approximately 33 ksi at the keel (compression) and 19 ksi at the strength deck (tension).

For the drydocking, Norfolk Naval Shipyard included drydock blocking under the bellyband of the sonar dome. This blocking was set to the sonar dome offset heights, providing sufficient loading of the blocking, since the bow/sonar dome had dropped approximately 1"due to relaxation of the structure since the collision.

4.Initial Assessment of Refloating the Ship with the Bow Section Removed:


USS Arthur Radford DD-968 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

USS ARTHUR W. RADFORD
(DD-968)

The RADFORD cleared Norfolk on 13 March 1979, for the Mediterranean and a tour with the Sixth Fleet. For six months, she participated in a variety of exercises and visited Sicily, Yugoslavia, Italy, Egypt, France, and Spain. During her deployment, the vessel fired her first Harpoon missile in the Mediterranean on 28 July. Her target was the hulk of the ex‑LANSDOWNE (DD�), which later became the Turkish GAZIANTEP (D�). She also participated in exercises in the Ionian and Tyrrhenian Seas and out of Alexandria. While en route from Toulon to Theoule, France, she rescued the French ketch, LAURCA, adrift 50 miles from the French resort of St. Tropez. The RADFORD was back in Norfolk at summer’s end. En route to Miami, she served as the platform for deck-landing qualifications for helicopter pilots. From Miami via Norfolk she proceeded to Halifax, Nova Scotia, in November 1979, to participate in a training exercise with American and Canadian warships. She ended the year in Norfolk.

For the first half of 1980, the warship operated along the East Coast, from Halifax to the Caribbean. She also stopped in Annapolis for midshipman visits. Following upkeep at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, the RADFORD prepared for an extended deployment flagship as the flagship for UNITAS XXI. She left Norfolk on 21 June, embarking HSL󈛆, Detachment 2, and proceeded to Roosevelt Roads.Over the next four months, she operated with elements of the navies of Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Argentina, Uruguay, and Brazil, visiting multiple ports and transiting the Panama Canal twice.

Completing UNITAS XXI on 4 November, she sailed for Gabon, as a unit of a West Africa training cruise, visiting Gabon, Ghana, Sierra Leone, and Senegal. She returned to Norfolk via Guadalupe in mid December. The ship spent the next two years engaged in operations along the East Coast and in the West Indies, She also underwent an overhaul at her builder’s yard. In September 1982, she operated with the U.S. Coast Guard on drug interdiction duties.

In 1983, the RADFORD operated in the Virginia Capes area and into the Atlantic as the flagship of DesRon 26, spent six months in the Mediterranean where she supported the multinational peacekeeping force in Beirut from 20 to 28 May. She served for a time with the guided‑missile frigate ANTRIM (FFG󈚸). She exercised with Sixth Fleet battle groups that summer, returning to the waters off Beirut on 18 September, serving as a ready-gunfire support ship until relieved by the battleship NEW JERSEY (BB󈛢) on 8 October. Homeward bound, the RADFORD cleared Rota on 10 November with the carrier DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN󈛩) battle group. She finished the year Norfolk.

She underwent an overhaul at the Metro Machine Shipyard at Portsmouth, Virginia, from February through April. After sea trials and repairs in the floating drydock SUSTAIN (AFDM𔂱), she returned to routine training and operations out of Norfolk and St. Croix. In August she became the flagship for DesRon 10, accompanied the recommissioned battleship IOWA (BB󈛡) to Roosevelt Roads, conducted gunfire support exercises off Vieques, and took part in exercises off the North Carolina coast.

She deployed with the Middle East Force in February 1985, with the BARNEY (DDG𔂰), ANTRIM, and CHARLES F. ADAMS (DDG𔂬). After visiting Naples she headed for Egypt to transit the Suez Canal on 27 February. She entered the Persian Gulf on 9 March for radar picket duty. Five days later, she responded to a Mayday from the Liberian‑flag tanker CARIBBEAN BREEZE that had been attacked and set afire in the central Persian Gulf. The destroyer provided medical advice and launched a helicopter to render assistance. Refueling on 25 March at Sitrah Anchorage, Bahrain, she resumed radar picket duty and surveillance operations. She also served as flagship for RADM John Addams, ComMidEastFor, through June.

After RADM Addams shifted his flag from the RADFORD, the ship served two more tours of radar picket duty in the Persian Gulf. On 7 June, her Sikorsky SH𔂭 Sea King helicopter conducted a life-saving mission, carrying a civilian rescued from drowning to the Bahrain hospital.

She underwent her final upkeep in the Persian Gulf at Mina Sulman, Manama, Bahrain, in June and on 4 July was replaced by the COMTE DE GRASSE (DD�). She and the ANTRIM conducted freedom of navigation operations off the coast of Yemen on the 11th. The destroyer transited the Suez Canal on the 14th, replenishing from the oiler USNS NEOSKO (T‑AO�) and fueling from the USNS TRUCKEE (T‑AO�) in the Mediterranean before the ANTRIM, BARNEY, and CHARLES F. ADAMS, at Rota to continue their voyage home. They arrived on 5 August 1985.

On 13 September 1985 Hurricane Gloria prompted the RADFORD to leave Norfolk to ride out the storm at an anchorage in the upper Chesapeake Bay. In late October, she left Norfolk for Halifax, Nova Scotia, to participate in the exercise, SHAREM 62, in Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland, until 6 November. She was back in Norfolk on 13 November and subsequently visited Boston and Newport to serve as a surface warfare officer school ship. She was back in Norfolk in time to conduct a dependents’ cruise on the 18 th .

March 1986 found her in the Norfolk shipyard for repair followed by local operations and a drydocking in the SUSTAIN, from May into June, for repairs to her struts and stern tubes, and an inspection of her sonar dome. Summer ended with gunfire support practice, surface gunnery exercises, and missile shoots. In early October the destroyer sailed to Guantanamo Bay soon thereafter to embark HSL󈛈, detachment 6, then proceeded to Roosevelt Roads, arriving on 6 October to load ammunition, take on fuel, and embark a coast guard law enforcement detachment for drug interdiction in the Caribbean. She detached the coast guardsmen in Nassau on 22 October and left for Norfolk on the 25th. The RADFORD got underway on 3 November 1986 for exercises in off Bermuda. En route, she assisted the PREBLE (DDG󈛒) in searching for a crewman lost in the Cape Hatteras area.

From 1987 on, the ship engaged in routine operations and deployments out of Norfolk until the early 1990s when she served in the first Gulf War. In May 1997, she received the first-ever shipboard installation of the advanced enclosed mast/sensor system, which greatly improved her ability to fight a modern war using the latest technological advances. The night of 4 February 1999, the RADFORD was conducting calibration tests on electronics equipment that required the ship to operate in circles around an electronic buoy. At the same time, the SAUDI RIYADH, a 29,259‑ton, 656‑foot‑long container ship, was approaching the Bay from the northeast, about to enter the shipping lanes before taking on a marine pilot to continue its trip to Baltimore.

At 11:34 p.m., the SAUDI RIYADH’s bow struck the starboard side of the RADFORD, about 30 feet behind her bow. The container ship sustained a four‑foot‑high, 30‑foot‑long gash along the port and starboard sides of her bow, with most of the damage to the port side. The more heavily damaged destroyer suffered a deep gash on her starboard side, penetrating nearly 25 feet into the main deck, ripping a pie‑shaped gash, and penetrating to the ship’s centerline. The hole ran from deck to waterline. The collision toppled her 5‑inch, 54‑caliber gun and damaged her Tomahawk cruise missile tubes. One sailor suffered a broken arm, 12 more had various injuries. The RADFORD sustained an estimated $32.7 million in damages. Repairs were completed on 13 September after which the destroyer joined the carrier EISENHOWER battle group In the Mediterranean. As a result of the collision, the RADFORD’s commanding officer was relieved.

The ARTHUR W. RADFORD was decommissioned in 2003 and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 6 April 2004. Four years later the navy made the RADFORD available for the creation of an artificial reef, a practice in force since 2006. On 8 June 2010, she was transferred to the State of Delaware. Stripped to her bare bones, the ship will go to her final resting place in 135 feet of water on the Deljerseyland Inshore Reef site, between Cape May, New Jersey, and Ocean City, Maryland. Not only will she provide a healthy habitat for fish and other marine life but will become a first-class dive site. She will be the largest ship ever reefed in that part of the Atlantic Ocean.

Chris Chiusano, of Middletown, Connecticut, served aboard the RADFORD during her final two years. He was interviewed by Bob Consodine for the New Jersey Star Ledger on 11 October 2010. Chiusano he visited the Philadelphia Navy Yard where she was being prepared for sinking. “I love that she’s being reefed,” he added. “It’s much better than seeing her turned into razor blades or being sold to another country. Now people can go down to see her. After all she went through in her career, she deserves this.”

“Jim Valdeslice, who was also interviewed, served in the ship’s crew from 1988�. He said it was ‘heart‑wrenching’ to see huge holes cut in the ship’s bulkhead and deck and the removal of her famous mast. But, as a diver, he looks forward to seeing her again. ‘And now my wife knows exactly where to put my ashes when I die,’ he said.”

Weather and other conditions permitting, the ARTHUR W. RADFORD will be sunk off the New Jersey coast sometime this year.

From The Tin Can Sailor, January 2012


Copyright 2012 Tin Can Sailors.
All rights reserved.
This article may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from
Tin Can Sailors.


USS Arthur W. Radford (DD-968) - Test Platform

Radford to the left and USS Conolly (DD-979) to the right.

The Norfolk-based Spruance-class destroyer USS Arthur W. Radford (DD 968) decommissioned on March 18, 2003 at Naval Station Norfolk. The ship will now serve as the test platform for the U.S. Navy’s future destroyer, DD(X).

This will not be the first time Radford has been used as a test platform. The ship used the newest and most robust cryptologic system during its last deployment. Although many ships now use this new cryptology system, Radford was the first to deploy with it.

Radford also introduced the Advanced Enclosed Mast System (AEM/S) to the Fleet in 1998. The ship’s unique, enclosed superstructure, which literally stands out among the masts of other ships, protects major antennas and other sensitive equipment. It also reduces maintenance and significantly reduces radar signature.

The ship will now be towed to Philadelphia where the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) Inactive Ships Maintenance Office (NISMO) will oversee its inactivation. Eventually, the ship will be towed to Pascagoula, Miss. where Northrop Grumman Ship Systems will equip it with three DD(X) Engineering Development Models, including the Integrated Power System (IPS), the Composite Deckhouse, and the Dual Band Radar. The IPS will allow rapid reconfiguration of power, reduced acoustic noise, and greater flexibility in ship design, according to David Caskey, a NAVSEA spokesperson.

The conversion, scheduled to begin in the fall of 2004, will take approximately one year.

Once Radford is converted, at-sea testing will begin in the Gulf of Mexico and Virginia Capes Operating Areas, including Lambert’s Point Range in Norfolk, and Wallops Island Range near the eastern Virginia shore. The Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center Range in the Bahamas will also be used for the ship’s testing.


Saturday, December 4, 2010

Coming in 2011, the USS Arthur W Radford

Coming in 2011, the USS Arthur W Radford will be the largest ship sunk on the East Coast as anartificial reef. This wreck will be an exciting addition to the local and national dive industry. This wreck will lay in approximately 140 feet of water with the top deck of the ship around 60 feet deep allowing for the whole range of divers from recreational to the technical diver.

USS Arthur W. Radford (DD-968) was a Spruance-class destroyer in the United States Navy. She was named for Admiral Arthur W. Radford USN (1896�), the first naval officer to hold the title of Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. She was laid down by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Division of Litton Industries at Pascagoula, Mississippi and launched on 21 March 1975, sponsored by Mrs. Arthur W. Radford, the widow of the late admiral. She commissioned on 16 April 1977 and decommissioned on 18 March 2003, after serving 26 years.

Dive charters to the USS Arthur Radford will be run out of Ocean City, MD by a recreational and technical dive boat "OC Dive Boat" http://www.ocdiveboat.com. They will be running weekly trips to the dive site and sign ups will be available online through there website.


Watch the video: USS Arthur W Radford sinking


Comments:

  1. Vuzilkree

    the answer Excellent, congratulations

  2. Dudon

    This does not suit me at all.



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