How the Snowmobile Got Its Start

How the Snowmobile Got Its Start


Bombardier takes it to the skies

Sixteen years after diversifying into rail transportation, Bombardier took flight in the aerospace sector in 1986 with the purchases of Canadair, the leading Canadian aircraft manufacturer of Challenger widebody business jets, and the CL-215 amphibious firefighting aircraft.

Under Bombardier’s leadership, the iconic Challenger never failed to evolve and raise industry standards. Its most recent versions, Challenger 350 and Challenger 650 are best sellers offering world-class interior design, worldwide reach and low operating costs.

Following in the CL-215’s footsteps, the Bombardier 415 amphibian launched in 1994 remains the only aircraft specifically designed for aerial firefighting and can be configured for other utility roles, including maritime search and rescue, surveillance and personnel transport.


What is the History of the John Deere Snowmobile?

While John Deere is most well-known for its production of agricultural, construction, forestry, and lawn care equipment, they have not always been solely focused on these markets. There was a span throughout the 1970s when John Deere produced their very own snowmobiles. The line helped to introduce the recognizable company slogan - “Nothing Runs Like a Deere.”

  • 1971: This was the first year that John Deere produced snowmobiles. This decision was powered by the shift towards snow sports that occurred at the beginning of the decade. The first two models to be produced were the 400 and the 500. The 400 was a 339 cc model, while the 500 was a 436 cc model.
  • 1972: In this year, the JDX8, the 600 and the JDX4 snowmobiles were released. Due to the excitement over the release, more than 12,000 of these machines were sold that year alone.
  • 1974: John Deere released the 295/S.
  • 1976: The Liquidator, 340 Liquifire, 340 Cyclone, 440 Liquifire, and 440 Cyclone were released in 1976. This helped to give customers a wider variety of equipment to choose from.
  • 1978: Due to popular interest from consumers, John Deere released some smaller snowmobile models. These were called the Spitfire model.
  • 1979: The 340 and 440 Trailfire machines were added to the John Deere lineup this year.
  • 1980: In 1980, John Deere became the official snowmobile supplier for the Winter Olympic Games, which took place in Lake Placid, New York.
  • 1982: John Deere stopped producing snowmobiles in 1982 when they sold their business to another company - Polaris.

How the Snowmobile Got Its Start - HISTORY

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1968 SL350

The root of all Yamaha snowmobiles, this stylish, white machine was introduced as a test model with technology gleaned from more than a decade of motorcycle manufacturing.

1969 SL351

The SL351, Yamaha's first full production model, introduced oil injection and slide-valve carburetors to the snowmobile industry - features that are still in use today.

1970 SS396

The SS396 provided a high level of performance for it's time. Its 'pulse-tuned' muffler design delivered performance that snowmobile enthusiasts were searching for.

1971 SW396

The first Yamaha sleds with reverse gear were the SW396 and SW433.

1972 GP433

The GP433 was a standard production model that immediately found success on professional race circuits as well as with backyard competitors

1972 EW643

The first Yamaha sleds with convenient electric start were the EW643 and EW433.

1973 SR433

This incredible race machine boasted awesome handling and speed that left even the 650cc sleds behind.

1973 SM292

The SM292 mounted the SL292's proven single-cylinder engine on a new, compact, lightweight chassis. The combination gave this model responsive handling and an excellent power-to-weight ratio.

1974 GPX433

Designed specifically for oval Stock-class racing, the GPX433 had a front-mounted engine and Yamaha's first production slide rail rear suspension that provided a revolutionary advance in performance and handling. Together with its smaller brother, the GPX338, these machines dominated competition on the racetrack.

1976 SRX440

The first Yamaha production sled with liquid-cooling. This high performance model's innovative radiator / heat exchanger cooling system introduced new technology to the sport, but it was the sled's winning ways on the racetrack that made it a legend. The liquid-cooled SRX340 was also introduced this same year.

1976 Exciter 440

With a forced air-cooled engine built upon the race-proven GPX chassis, the Exciter 440 provided performance for every family member, from the sport-minded enthusiast to the touring-type snowmobiler.

1977 Enticer 250

The Enticer 250 featured a new single-cylinder engine housed in a lightweight, compact package. Its friendly powerband, light weight, wide stance and short track offered responsive, exciting handling.

1979 Excel V

Built for snowmobilers who wanted to ride long and far in ultimate comfort, the EC540 boasted a 16.5-inch track and standard electric start.

1980 SRV

The SRV was the first snowmobile to utilize the Yamaha Telescopic Strut Suspension (T.S.S.) design. The machine performed especially well over the rough terrain typical of cross-country racing.

1982 Bravo

The first model of the famous Bravo line, the BR250 was a hit with everyone from beginners to veterans thanks to its compact engine and incredibly light frame. The Bravo set the standard for lightweight machines.

1983 SRV

By introducing Yamaha's first 'ProAction' rear suspension on this model, the SRV became famous for offering superior ride quality over competitive models.

1984 Phazer

Developed to offer real sports riding in a variety of conditions, the Phazer was light in weight and featured a powerful, lightweight fan-cooled engine and an aerodynamic, handlebar-mounted fairing that began a new era in snowmobiling. The Phazer would become the best-selling snowmobile in the world and rocketed Yamaha to No. 1.

1986 Inviter

The Inviter featured a unique, sit-in rider position that was a daring departure from the common sled designs of the day

1987 Exciter L/C

A snowmobile that certainly lived up to its name, the Exciter built upon the Phazer success by introducing liquid-cooled twin-cylinder power in a great-looking package. The Yamaha-exclusive handlebar mounted fairing continued to set this snowmobile apart from the competition.

1988 Snoscoot

An amazing amount of fun in a tiny package, the SnoScoot was a hit with kids of all ages. The SnoScoot used an 80cc scooter engine and lightweight tube frame for a completely different direction than the typical snowmobiles of its day. This unique machine was built to attract new riders to the sport.

1988 VK 540

A revelation in the utility machine market, the VK 540 boasted a 20" wide, 156" long track, reverse and high/low gear selection. The heavy-duty model won the hearts of many and became the utility sled standard.

1991 Exciter II

The Exciter II featured lightweight and durable dispersion-coated plated cylinders, industry-leading Digital C.D.I., a large-ratio clutch system, new ProAction rear suspension and new hood styling.

1992 Vmax-4

A truly ground-breaking machine, the Vmax-4 featured an impressive four-cylinder engine and one of the highest displacements of its day. One of the first true "musclesleds", the Vmax-4 won countless awards from industry press and victories on racetracks, where it was nearly unstoppable.

1993 Exciter II SX

An evolution in the Exciter bloodline, the Exciter II SX used an advanced T.S.S. front-end for more aggressive cornering. An immediate success with high-performance enthusiasts everywhere.

1994 Vmax 600

The Vmax 600 raised the bar by combining trail-riding power and comfort in a great looking package. In addition to the Vmax 600, Yamaha also introduced a complete 600cc and 500cc model line-up with luxury touring, 2-up touring and long-track deep-snow versions. Key styling cues were taken from the powerful Vmax-4 to give the Vmax models a strong Yamaha identity.

1995 Vmax 800

A more advanced, more powerful version of the 1992 model, this new Vmax-4 had 800cc of pure 4-cylinder muscle roaring under its hood. It remains a force in drag racing to this day, nearly 10 years after its initial release.

1996 Vmax 600 XT

The Vmax 600 XT became the sled of choice for riders seeking a powerful engine and a superb long-travel suspension. The XT was perfect for those who wanted impressive performance in a comfortable package.

1997 Vmax 700 SX

The Vmax 700 SX is, quite simply, one of the greatest snowmobiles of all time. Universally lauded by the industry press, the sled featured an all-new trailing arm design that provided razor-sharp handling and Yamaha's first triple-cylinder engine. In addition to the snowmobile's smooth, linear power, the package was by far the lightest machine in its class due to an innovative, lightweight chassis

1998 SRX 700

The SRX 700 continued the SRX legend by delivering triple-pipe power and precise ndling in a great-looking package - completely dominating the Top Performance snowmobile category, both in sales and in competition. This model included industry first, self-cleaning exhaust power valves.

2000 Mountain Max 700

The Mountain Max 700 was the perfect sled for mountain riding. With an exclusive 141" deep lug track design smooth, immediate power from its lightweight triple-cylinder engine and incredible floatation from the ProAction Mountain rear suspension, the Mountain Max 700 excelled in deep powder, on steep climbs and even on rutted mountain trails.

2000 SX700R

When first introduced, the SX 700 R was perhaps the best handling trail machine ever, according to the snowmobile press. Powered by Yamaha's sleek, single-piped triple-cylinder engine, the SX-R boasted outstanding suspension, allowing riders to pound through the toughest terrain with ease.

2002 SX Viper

Proof of the SXViper's appeal, it was the industry's largest-selling model in 2002. Far more than simply a design landmark with its aggressive styling, fluid lines and awesome ergonomics, the SXViper is an incredible trail machine with its potent triple-cylinder single-pipe engine, light-but-rigid chassis and superb handling.

2003 RX-1

The RX-1 changed the look, feel and sound of high-performance snowmobiles. Combining four-stroke motorcycle engine technology with an all-new chassis layout, the RX-1 delivers the optimum combination of four-stroke performance, handling, durability and style. The RX-1 is the industry's first four-stroke, high-performance snowmobile.

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Scorpion Snowmobiles

The history of snowmobiling is littered with memories of brands that have faded away like melting snow. There are however certain brands that were.

The Other Major Minnesota Snowmobile Manufacturer
By Hal Armstrong

The history of snowmobiling is littered with memories of brands that have faded away like melting snow. There are however certain brands that were major players for three decades until they closed their doors in the early 80’s.

Scorpion was a major player in the industry in the 70’s and, like Polaris and Arctic Cat, was built in the state of Minnesota.

Scorpion originally entered the market as Trail-A-Sled Inc. and built propeller-driven air sleds. This was long before the first tracked vehicles started to become popular. The company had become a major supplier of fiberglass components for a company called Polaris, supplying body parts in 1963. A spinoff company known as Rubber Drives Inc. had also been started by a co-founder and was the first manufacturer of a continuous rubber track in the United States.

The company soon realized that the snowmobile was on the verge of exploding across the North American Snow Belt. Trail-A Sled, just like Ski-Doo, was able to manufacture the majority of its own components, which gave it a huge cost and quality advantage over its competitors. With the in-house capability to build a snowmobile, the company built their first sleds for the 1964 season and the name “Scorpion” was born!

The Scorpion brand quickly exploded on to the winter landscape and by 1969 was building 20,000 sleds annually. Scorpion would continue to innovate with the Para-Rail track suspension and the Power Thrust primary clutch. Two-stroke engines built in Germany by Sachs, Hirth and JLO were the predominant engine suppliers to the entire snowmobile industry. Scorpion had become partial to using JLO engines in a number of its models over the years. Japanese engines started to become more popular as the main sled builders looked for exclusive engine suppliers (Kawasaki for Arctic Cat, Fuji for Polaris, etc.) in the early 70’s. The Scorpion management team began talks with JLO parent company Rockwell to purchase the JLO engine division. The entire JLO manufacturing machinery was moved to Crosby, Minnesota. While not the first domestic two-stroke engine builder, they did beat their Minnesota rivals Polaris and Arctic Cat to the punch. Polaris would not have this capability until 1997 and Arctic Cat most recently in 2014.

Scorpion would attract many of the top motor engineers from its competitors including Gerry Reese, designer of the first American-made liquid cooled two-strokes from Brutanza Engineering. The new made-in-America engine was known as the “Cuyuna” and they would build primarily fan-cooled twins from 300cc to 440cc, but also a 340cc rotary induction liquid cooled twin.

The company management team seemed to be using the motto, “Go Big or Go Home” as they continued to grow through key acquisitions in the industry. This homework was setting them setting them up for a clean sheet of paper snowmobile called the “Whip”

1975 Scorpion Whip – the Shape of Things to Go
Back in 1975 the consumer still had around 20 snowmobile manufactures to choose from. Names like Alouette, Sno-Jet, Evinrude and Boa-ski were still pumping out sleds. The following year the count was down to about 15. Scorpion, with its new engine plant and a completely new chassis, was entering the ‘75 season full of optimism.

Chassis
The new sled featured an all-aluminum chassis, a first for Scorpion. The design placed the motor over the skis, a major departure from previous years which still had the engine mounted on top of the tunnel. While the company had lagged behind the industry leaders with their tunnel mounted engine chassis, the new Whip now featured a low and wide ski stance of 29” contributing to less inside ski lift when cornering and a lower centre of gravity. The 440 Whip was the lightest 440-trail sled on the market in ‘75 tipping the scales at just 385 pounds with a 6-gallon fuel tank. The ‘75 Whip was now 63 pounds lighter than the popular Super Stinger model it replaced!

Para-Rail Track Suspension
Back in the early 70’s Scorpion engineer Gerald Irvine was looking at how to improve the performance of the snowmobile track suspension. The predominant suspension system back then was the “bogie wheel” system pioneered by Ski-Doo. The endless rubber track invented by Bombardier worked well with this system but a rough ride and lack of adjustability to improve weight transfer was its drawbacks.

In the mid 60’s Arctic Cat’s Roger Skime had developed the slide rail suspension that worked well with the other popular track option (cleated track) which was a three belt construction with steel “U” shaped grouser bars (known as cleats) holding the belts together. The drawback with this track/slide rail combo was running on ice and limited snow. The Hyfax sliders would heat up, increasing drag and wearing out quickly.

Scorpion’s Irvine came up with the “Para-Rail” suspension that was a combination of both the bogie wheel and slide rail designs that could be used with the more durable all-rubber track. The Para Rail was one of the first track suspensions to utilize a front torque arm, which was controlled by torsion springs. The front torque arm improved weight transfer to the rear of the sled during acceleration. Scorpions were always hard to beat off the line and this design also improved its deep snow capability.

What was missing was a shock absorber attached to the front torque arm to control damping – that feature was still a number of years away. The rear of the suspension utilized a single vertical-mounted shock with twin torsion springs. The rear shock assembly was connected directly to the rear track wheels of the suspension. The independent springing on the rear arm allowed the rails to flex, keeping as much of the track (see Fig.8-10) on the ground for improved traction. The suspension was patented in 1971 and Para-Rail and Scorpion were forever linked, much like Ski-Doo and R-Motion are today.

Power Thrust Clutching
Scorpion not only assembled their own engines they also had designed their own clutching package. In the mid 70’s the big four had been working on their own clutching solutions and Scorpion was no different. The ‘75 Whip continued with the original Power Thrust primary, which featured three roller weight arms, which acted against primitive ramps stamped into the clutch cover. The moveable sheave portion containing the roller arms and the cover transferred power through a spline torque bushing. The Power Thrust functioned similar to the original Ski-doo TRA primary clutch but without the adjustability. The owner easily removed the clutch from the motor without any special pullers, which was handy for service work.

Power from the primary was transferred to the chaincase-mounted secondary. While many manufacturers were using disc brakes and jackshaft-mounted secondary clutching, the ‘75 Whip was still old school in this department. In fact, Scorpion used the stationary side of the secondary as the brake drum. A mechanical brake acting on the 10” diameter secondary provided the stopping power. A double row chain enclosed in a die-cast aluminum chain case transferred the power to a Gates 16”x 118” rubber track wrapped around the Para-Rail suspension.

Made in the USA Cuyuna Engines
The original Whip was offered in three popular engine sizes of the day. All were fan-cooled twin cylinder four port engines. A single Walbro butterfly carb metered the fuel into the engine and a two-into-one exhaust kept the noise to a dull roar. The snowmobile industry in 1975 was really focusing on reduced intake and exhaust noise levels. Air intake systems were in their infancy and Scorpion had implemented a 90-degree bend to reduce noise. Liberal amounts of acoustic foam under the hood made sure the sled met the noise standards. Scorpion continued to use magneto ignitions on the Cuyuna engines while most of the competition had long moved to CDI. The engines would prove to be reliable and the 440 produced hp in the low 40’s.

Putting it all Together
Scorpion had a lot on their plate back in 1974. First, they had bought Brutanza Engineering and the Brut Liquid Cooled snowmobile lineup. Moving an entire engine plant from Germany, installing machinery, training employees and manufacturing motors then followed this up. If that was not enough, the engineering group had designed a completely new snowmobile called the Whip.

Scorpion pulled it off and the brand loyal Scorpion customer snapped up the Whip in droves. Scorpion built 16,000 snowmobiles in 1975. Scorpion’s quality policy was simple – make sure that whatever can go wrong won’t. Most of us avoid a first year model until all the “bugs” have been worked out. Scorpion was confident enough to take a production Whip from a dealer showroom and enter it in the 1975 Winnipeg-St. Paul 500-mile cross-country race that year. The result? Well, they didn’t win, but out of 377 starters only 22 machines finished and the Whip finished 7th!

The Bittersweet End
In March of 1978 Scorpion was purchased by Arctic Enterprises. In July 1978, Arctic announced plans to move their Heavy Hauler trailer business to Crosby-Ironton. By February of 1979, employment at Scorpion was at 360 and Heavy Hauler Trailers began rolling off the assembly line.

Curiously, it was during this time frame of the Arctic Cat/Scorpion relationship that oval racing legend Brad Hulings and his capable wrench David Karpik took some “left-over” Arctic Cat race sleds and transformed them into the Scorpion Squadron, a fiercely competitive racing effort that not only embarrassed their Arctic Cat owners, but most anyone else that got in their way. During the 1978-79 Sno Pro racing season, the Scorpion Squadron claimed seventeen firsts, twelve seconds, and eight third-place trophies, and returned from Finland and Sweden with three first-place and one second-place trophies – bringing the season to a thunderous end.

But, by January of 1980, even though Hulings had claimed an impressive second place finish at the Eagle River World Championship event, layoffs begin hitting the Crosby-Ironton manufacturing facility. In March of 1980, sighting a number of economic and industry woes (namely sluggish economic conditions, historically high interest rates and rising fuel prices), Arctic Cat embarked upon a consolidation strategy and the Crosby-Ironton manufacturing facility was officially put up for sale. As manufacturing transitioned to Thief River Falls, Arctic added only one new Scorpion model – the Sidewinder – for 1981, basically an Arctic Cat dressed in Scorpion clothing.

In February of 1981, under extreme pressure from creditors, Arctic Cat filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Large amount of parts and equipment were sold at auction for bargain basement prices. Although not officially announced at the time, the bankruptcy filing led directly to the ultimate demise of Scorpion. The brand never survived the reorganization process. Scorpion was finished, if only for a time. Shortly thereafter, with the purchase of engine manufacturing assets, Cuyuna Development Co. announced their intention to manufacture small engines in a portion of the former Scorpion plant in Crosby.

Finally, in May of 1982, many of Arctic’s assets were sold to Certified Parts Corporation of Janesville, Wisconsin, including the licensing rights to Scorpion snowmobiles.

Conclusion
The Scorpion brand and the people behind it were as passionate about their product as their competitors were. Perhaps the company expanded too big too fast but had the perfect storm of back to back years of low snow and a bad economy not conspired against the company they might still be in production today. What we know for sure is that in a brand loyal industry, the Scorpion faithful were as passionate and committed to their brand as their Minnesota cousins to the north of them.


Forgotten, But Beloved Dead Snowmobile Brands

Remember the great blizzards of 1966, 1993, and all those other Nor’easters? They made for the need for snowmobiles. Lots. But over the years, fuel prices, competition, and warm winters have put many snowmobile brands off the market.

Ariens – These were big orange snowmobiles made the by famous lawn and snow equipment company. It did not make the cut in 1973, dealing with a lawsuit and lack of snow.

John Deere – Another lawn and snow equipment brand let loose this Deere division sold to competitor Polaris Industries in 1982 with fans still waiting for 1985 John Deere Wildfire IFS snowmobiles. John Deere bodies were found on many Polaris models lasting into the mid-decade 2000s.

Rupp – This once popular brand quickly died out thanks to mismanagement and debt and lack of snow. The Chrysler division Dodge in a manner sort of revitalized Rupp product names, using names such as Nitro, Magnum, SS, etc.

Scorpion – One of first brands, and beloved by fans. Bought out by then Arctic Enterprises (the Arctic Cat Inc predecessor) but got Scorpion got stinged because of Arctic Enterprises’ bankruptcy and it ceased operations. Scorpion had a very brief comeback in 2000 and failed again, due to costs.

Raidar/Manta – Indy car style snowmobiles often made a come back in 1970s and 1980s but the company was sold and ceased for good.

Moto-Ski – A division of Bombardier Corporation, maker of Ski-doo (now BRP) the orange version of the Ski-doo brand. Ironically, Ski-doo now sports some orange hue! Shades of Moto-Ski?

Mercury Snowmobiles – A division of Mercury Marine best in racing and popular in the 1970s. Mercury is now frozen up and focused on marine products, instead.

Blaze – A customized snowmobile brand that pioneered forward platform and narrow snowmobiles since 1995 it has since closed up shop.

Massey Ferguson – Like Deere and Ariens, the farm equipment company once made snowmobiles, as well.

Sears Snowmobiles – The iconic retailer experimented in selling motorized recreational products in stores and catalogs. As competition increased, and other factors interfered, Sears decided to downsize.

JCPenney Snowmobiles – Another national retailer, like Sears, sold its own brand of private label snowmobile.

Chaparral Snowmobiles – A beautiful brand that flew away and decided to stick with marine products.

Kawasaki Snowmobiles – This Japanese brand also once made snowmobiles, but miscommunication with top brass cut the products without a word.

Sno-Jet – These were beautiful blue sleds, but they jetted when Kawasaki bought out a good brand.

Fox-Trac – This brand was so popular that even Elvis Presley owned one until his death. It is now a snowmobile supplier, making shocks and parts.

There were so many brands but not popular. Some lasted just about one week! Many other brands were Boa-Ski, Auto-Ski, Norway, Sno-Prince, Evinrude Snowmobil es, division of OMC, Johnson Snowmobiles, division of OMC, Ski-Daddle, Harley-Davidson, AMF, Skiroule, Wheel-Horse, Agro, Alouette, Sno-Pony, Bolens, Viking, and many more.


Why Support the GRST?

The Gold Rush Snowmobile Trail (GRST) would like to thank everyone who has helped us to make our dreams come true. We are constantly receiving an astounding amount of support from volunteers and donors. With their passion and commitment, the GRST is increasingly becoming an even more astounding success. To find out who has already contributed, please visit the supporters page.

We encourage you to get involved. Every person who volunteers greatly contributes to the GRST. Please visit the volunteer page to sign up as there are a number of jobs available for individuals with varied skills and abilities. If you would like to donate, please visit our donation page. No matter the commitment you are able to make, you can make a difference.

All funds raised through gracious donations are placed towards the ongoing maintenance of the trail which includes clearing, signing and grooming. The specific location will be decided in consultation with the BCSF and the Regional Management Committee.

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The Future of DNA

The future of DNA has great potential. As researchers and scientists continue to advance what we know about the complexities of DNA and the insights it codes for, we can imagine a world with less and better-managed disease, longer life spans, and a personalized view of medicine that’s specifically applicable to individuals rather than the population as a whole.

DNA insights are already enabling the diagnosis and treatment of genetic diseases. Science is also hopeful that medicine will advance to be able to leverage the power of our own cells to fight disease. For example, gene therapy is designed to introduce genetic material into cells to compensate for abnormal genes or to make a therapeutically beneficial protein.

Researchers also continue to use DNA sequencing technology to learn more about everything from combating infectious disease outbreaks to improving nutritional security.

Ultimately, DNA research will accelerate breaking the mold of the one-size-fits-all approach to medicine. Every new discovery in our understanding of DNA lends to further advancement in the idea of precision medicine, a relatively new way doctors are approaching healthcare through the use of genetic and molecular information to guide their approach to medicine. With precision or personalized medicine, interventions take into consideration the unique biology of the patient and are tailored individually to each patient, rather than being based on the predicted response for all patients. Using genetics and a holistic view of individual genetics, lifestyle, and environment on a case-by-case basis, doctors are better able to not only predict accurate prevention strategies, but also suggest more effective treatment options.

We’ve come leaps and bounds from where we were in terms of our understanding of DNA 150 years ago. But still, there is much to learn. And with the potential that a deeper understanding of DNA will improve human health and quality of life across our world, no doubt, the research will continue. A full understanding of DNA of and between all living things could one day contribute to solving problems like world hunger, disease prevention, and fighting climate change. The potential truly is unlimited, and to say the least, extremely exciting.


Where Is Cornhole Popular?

Cornhole began its popularity in the midwestern states comprised mostly of farmland because, you guessed it, more corn. However, the game Cornhole emerged as a favorite pastime in Cincinnati about 15 years ago and soon spread like wildfire to back yard barbecues, beaches, breweries, and campgrounds across the United States

Bars and pubs across the United States now host regular Cornhole tournaments. The favorite game has also seen significant usage in marketing and custom Cornhole boards are regularly used at weddings and family events. There are even Cornhole classes being taught across the country.

The chances are very good that if you go to any backyard party or barbecue this year, you&rsquoll likely find delicious food, tasty drinks, and people playing Cornhole. This game has grown in popularity because of its portability, easy to understand rules, and&helliplet&rsquos be honest, you don&rsquot have to be a star athlete to play a good game of Cornhole.


OUR STORY

The first Yamaha motorized product was the YA-1 Motorcycle (125cc, 2-stroke, single-cylinder, street bike). Nicknamed “The Red Dragonfly,” it was produced and sold in Japan. The brand new YA-1 won the first two races it entered that year.

The first Yamaha motorized product was the YA-1 Motorcycle (125cc, 2-stroke, single-cylinder, street bike). Nicknamed “The Red Dragonfly,” it was produced and sold in Japan. The brand new YA-1 won the first two races it entered that year.

The YD1 Motorcycle

The first Yamaha Motorcycles sold in the USA were imported by Cooper Motors, an independent distributor. The models were the YD1 (250cc, 2-stroke, twin cylinder, streetbike) and MF-1 (50cc, 2-stroke, single cylinder, streetbike, step-through).

Yamaha enters the world of international racing by competing in the Catalina Grand Prix in California, In this first attempt against the world’s seasoned racing machines, Yamaha placed an impressive 6th place. This race marked the first time a Japanese motorcycle raced in the U.S.

The first Yamaha Motorcycles sold in the USA were imported by Cooper Motors, an independent distributor. The models were the YD1 (250cc, 2-stroke, twin cylinder, streetbike) and MF-1 (50cc, 2-stroke, single cylinder, streetbike, step-through).

Yamaha enters the world of international racing by competing in the Catalina Grand Prix in California, In this first attempt against the world’s seasoned racing machines, Yamaha placed an impressive 6th place. This race marked the first time a Japanese motorcycle raced in the U.S.

Yamaha's First Outboard Motor

Yamaha introduces its first Outboard Motor, the P-7, for the Japanese market. It was soon replaced by the more sophisticated and compact P-3 model. Both featured distinctive, bright yellow cowlings.

Yamaha International Corporation began selling motorcycles in the USA as well as Yamaha’s legendary musical instruments.

Yamaha introduces its first Outboard Motor, the P-7, for the Japanese market. It was soon replaced by the more sophisticated and compact P-3 model. Both featured distinctive, bright yellow cowlings.

Yamaha International Corporation began selling motorcycles in the USA as well as Yamaha’s legendary musical instruments.

World Grand Prix, RND 3

Yamaha’s first appearance in World GP road racing at Round 3, the France GP. Took 6th place in World GP 250cc class at round 4, the Isle of Man TT Race in Britain.

Yamaha’s first appearance in World GP road racing at Round 3, the France GP. Took 6th place in World GP 250cc class at round 4, the Isle of Man TT Race in Britain.

Yamaha Collaborates with Toyota

Yamaha collaborates with Toyota to develop and manufacture the Toyota 2000GT sports car. A modified convertible 2000GT was featured in the 1967 James Bond movie “You Only Live Twice.”

Yamaha wins its first 250cc class victory at the Daytona Grand Prix.

Yamaha collaborates with Toyota to develop and manufacture the Toyota 2000GT sports car. A modified convertible 2000GT was featured in the 1967 James Bond movie “You Only Live Twice.”

Yamaha wins its first 250cc class victory at the Daytona Grand Prix.

Yamalube Brand is Introduced

Yamaha introduces the now iconic Yamalube brand of oils and lubricants. The Yamalube commitment to high quality and performance is now recognized around the world.

Yamaha introduces the now iconic Yamalube brand of oils and lubricants. The Yamalube commitment to high quality and performance is now recognized around the world.

Yamaha's First Snowmobile

Yamaha's first Snowmobile, the SL350 (2-stroke, twin cylinder), is introduced. This was the first snowmobile with slide-valve carburetors.

The DT-1 Enduro is introduced. The world's first dual-purpose motorcycle had on & off-road capability. Its impact on Motorcycling in the USA was enormous.

Yamaha's first Snowmobile, the SL350 (2-stroke, twin cylinder), is introduced. This was the first snowmobile with slide-valve carburetors.

The DT-1 Enduro is introduced. The world's first dual-purpose motorcycle had on & off-road capability. Its impact on Motorcycling in the USA was enormous.

Yamaha’s first 4-stroke motorcycle

Yamaha’s first 4-stroke motorcycle model, the XS-1 (650cc vertical twin) is introduced. Production of XS650 models would continue through the 1983 model year, and the bike is favored today by customizers.

Yamaha’s first 4-stroke motorcycle model, the XS-1 (650cc vertical twin) is introduced. Production of XS650 models would continue through the 1983 model year, and the bike is favored today by customizers.

Daytona 200 Victory

Yamaha wins its first Daytona 200 and would go on to be unbeatable for more than a decade.

Yamaha wins its first Daytona 200 and would go on to be unbeatable for more than a decade.

The SR433

The SR433, a purpose-built racer, was offered in 1972 and 1973.

Yamaha continues expansion into new markets by introducing Generators.

The SR433, a purpose-built racer, was offered in 1972 and 1973.

Yamaha continues expansion into new markets by introducing Generators.

YZ Monocross Beginnings

Yamaha pioneers the very first single-shock, production motocross bikes. This was the beginning of the YZ Monocross machines that changed motocross forever.

Yamaha pioneers the very first single-shock, production motocross bikes. This was the beginning of the YZ Monocross machines that changed motocross forever.

The SRX440 Snowmobile

The legendary SRX440 snowmobile hits the market and quickly catapults Yamaha to the forefront of the snowmobile racing scene.

The legendary SRX440 snowmobile hits the market and quickly catapults Yamaha to the forefront of the snowmobile racing scene.

Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. is founded

Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. is founded to better fulfill the needs of the American market and establish a separate identity (from music & electronics) for Yamaha motorized products.

Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. is founded to better fulfill the needs of the American market and establish a separate identity (from music & electronics) for Yamaha motorized products.

Golf Cars are introduced in the USA

Golf Cars were introduced in the USA with the G1 gas model.

The XS1100 motorcycle (four cylinder, shaft drive) is introduced.

XS650 Special is introduced. This was the first production Cruiser built by a Japanese manufacturer.

Kenny Roberts became the first American to win a Grand Prix motorcycle racing world championship, aboard his iconic yellow-and-black 500cc Yamaha

Golf Cars were introduced in the USA with the G1 gas model.

The XS1100 motorcycle (four cylinder, shaft drive) is introduced.

XS650 Special is introduced. This was the first production Cruiser built by a Japanese manufacturer.

Kenny Roberts became the first American to win a Grand Prix motorcycle racing world championship, aboard his iconic yellow-and-black 500cc Yamaha

Yamaha Develops YICS

YICS (Yamaha Induction Control System), a fuel-saving engine system, is developed for 4-stroke engines.

YICS (Yamaha Induction Control System), a fuel-saving engine system, is developed for 4-stroke engines.

Cypress, CA

The new Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. corporate office is opened in Cypress, California.

The first Yamaha 3-wheel ATV is sold in USA… the Tri-Moto (YT125).

The G1-E electric-powered Golf Car model is introduced.

The new Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. corporate office is opened in Cypress, California.

The first Yamaha 3-wheel ATV is sold in USA… the Tri-Moto (YT125).

The G1-E electric-powered Golf Car model is introduced.

The Virago 750 Cruiser

Yamaha’s first air-cooled, V-twin cruiser, the Virago 750, was introduced.

Yamaha’s first air-cooled, V-twin cruiser, the Virago 750, was introduced.

The FZ750 motorcycle

The first production 5-valve per cylinder engine is introduced on the 4-cylinder, DOHC, FZ750 motorcycle.

Yamaha’s first 4-wheel ATV, the YFM200 “Moto-4”, is introduced in the USA.

The Phazer snowmobile is introduced. Innovative design, light in weight and nimble handling character made this model one of the most popular for several years.

Yamaha begins marketing Outboard Motors in the USA.

The first production 5-valve per cylinder engine is introduced on the 4-cylinder, DOHC, FZ750 motorcycle.

Yamaha’s first 4-wheel ATV, the YFM200 “Moto-4”, is introduced in the USA.

The Phazer snowmobile is introduced. Innovative design, light in weight and nimble handling character made this model one of the most popular for several years.

Yamaha begins marketing Outboard Motors in the USA.

The V-Max 1200 Musclebike

The V-Max 1200 musclebike hits the streets. The 4-cylinder V4 includes “V-Boost,” a butterfly valve technology that opens at higher rpm to feed each cylinder from two carburetors for extra power.

The V-Max 1200 musclebike hits the streets. The 4-cylinder V4 includes “V-Boost,” a butterfly valve technology that opens at higher rpm to feed each cylinder from two carburetors for extra power.

Newnan, GA

Yamaha Motor Manufacturing Corporation of America is founded in Newnan, Georgia.

Yamaha Motor Manufacturing Corporation of America is founded in Newnan, Georgia.

Yamaha introduces personal watercraft

The sit-down WaveRunner and the stand-up WaveJammer Water Vehicles. The WaveRunner is the model that created today's PWC market.

A new exhaust system for 4-stroke engines, “EXUP,” is developed to provide higher horsepower output throughout an engine's powerband.

The venerable TW200 is introduced. This practical, do it all dual purpose motorcycle is still a favorite today, making it Yamaha’s longest running model sold in the U.S. More trivia? The TW200 is the first motorcycle ever to be ridden to the North Pole, by Shinji Kazama in 1987.

The Banshee ATV is introduced. Featuring the 2-cylinder, 2-stroke engine originally from the RZ350 street bike, there was nothing like it on the dunes. Although it’s been discontinued in the U.S. for over a decade, it still enjoys a cult following to this day.

Yamaha Motor Manufacturing Company begins Golf Car and Water Vehicle production for U.S. and overseas markets.

The sit-down WaveRunner and the stand-up WaveJammer Water Vehicles. The WaveRunner is the model that created today's PWC market.

A new exhaust system for 4-stroke engines, “EXUP,” is developed to provide higher horsepower output throughout an engine's powerband.


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